DoD was pretty good actually. Long post about evaluating retro games.

runequester

Warrior
Joined
29 Apr 2018
Messages
244
Greetings gang and my apologies for writing in English. You are welcome to respond in Swedish or English as you prefer.

I have always had a lot of fondness for the venerable Drakar och Demoner, growing up with the Danish version of the rules (corresponding to the 1987 version of the rules + Expert) and generally sticking with BRP-type games much of the time, including a 1 year-long game of Hjältarnas Tid (with a bit of translation work on my part since I was running it for my American friends) recently.

Of course all things "retro" are cool again (see the OSR and the revival releases of the last half decade of everything from the Bloodsword game books to Lone Wolf to Dragon Warriors) so I think it is worth examining DoD in the same light those games receive. A lot of talk on Swedish forums like this one tend to focus on the playstyle in terms of the adventures and like the OSR folks, it tends to pick out the really cool and unique stuff, while ignoring the stuff that kinda sucked. That's not a bad thing: After all, there is no point in revisiting the garbage when we can pick and choose now that we understand better what makes for a good campaign.

I think often the rules themselves get overlooked or even dismissed a bit. There seems to be an unstated assumption that DoD was actually kind of shit and that we should be lucky to have moved on. I'm not sure if some of that is just the general Scandinavian feeling that something can't be cool unless it's in English (certainly the case in Denmark) and it has always puzzled me a little because DoD holds up very well next to something like OpenQuest (which is quite popular) and certainly compared to many OSR games that are flooding the market.

More importantly, the experience I’ve had running DoD for American folks (with no prior exposure to the game) have almost universally been positive and the game has been very well received. So clearly, there is a bit of a grey area to discuss.
So I wanted to dig into a few considerations that I think affect how we look at old games, as well as maybe just sparking some discussion.

All of this isn’t to say that games like HT or Symbaroum cannot be improvements on the sort of mechanical structure DoD had or that DoD didn’t have its flaws. That’s for the reader to decide, we loved our time with HT for sure.

I think when we talk about old RPG’s there are a few factors that tend to color the discussion:

First:

Often we conflate the bad campaigns we played with the rules and assume that because our games sucked back then, the rules were bad. Thing is, most of us started gaming when we were children or teenagers and we ran the sort of campaigns teenagers run: Complete garbage :) Bad GM’s, unfair rules decisions, players who just wanted to kill (or fuck) everything they met, cheaters and power gamers, you know the drill.

Today, looking back at 30+ years of experience as gamers, we are able to create the sort of campaigns we always wanted to: Deep characters that interact in a living, responsive setting with cool and fun adventures to go on. And since we’re now playing D&D5 (or whatever) we tend to mentally assume this means D&D5 is the cause for the campaigns being so good, when in reality giving those books to a bunch of teenagers produces the same sort of dysfunctional garbage we all had to sit through. A look at the rpghorrorstories sub on Reddit should be ample evidence for this.

Second:

We all remember the really broken thing about a game because it’s usually something that grinds our gears when we play, and so when we switch to another game that solves that particular problem (or just handles it better) we tend to assume that the new game is better overall even if it has other problems that are as frustrating (or more so).
Of course this may be true for a particular person, but I think it tends to overlook other factors.

To use an example, D&D lacks the “ping pong” problem of old school BRP combat (where many blows are ineffective) but swaps that for problems such as caster supremacy, hit point grinding and the fact that many character builds are simply not viable mechanically.

Is that “better’? Well, it might be for a specific player because the problems of D&D may in fact be things you enjoy, but obviously by focusing on only specific concerns, we are missing out on the advantages we had as well.

Third:

Of course over the years playstyles also simply change. Games on the market today have different choices than the games of the 80’s.
Games today tend towards the more heroic and dramatic (D&D5, Pathfinder, Savage Worlds, 13th Age) and / or tend to put higher emphasis on being mechanically intricate or high concept.

The game design spirit of the 80s BRP era was heavily driven by the assumption that games should simulate a world to some extent (a style that has almost entirely disappeared outside of games like Harnmaster), that the rules should be a fairly solid framework but should NOT try to account for every possible situation and that characters should be defined by their skills, not a list of bespoke special abilities.

Now again, anyone might prefer one or the other, that’s really not the question. But it is worth noting that an old game will often seem “outdated” simply because it does not accomplish something that it never set out to do in the same way that we might prefer dogs to cats (if you are a monster :) ) but it’s not the fault of the cat that it is bad at being a dog.

Fourth:

When a game has known problems or short-falls, it is common for us to focus on them because nerds like to discuss rules and try to come up with solutions. So it is easy for us to over-estimate the extent of the actual problem since we’ve talked about it so much.

I would argue that many of the problems with DoD do tend to be over-stated in conversation. After all, people played the game for years just fine: Ping Pong is a problem but many attacks cannot be parried, monsters cannot parry and most characters have very limited parries.

Spell casting being difficult is a problem, but a starting character can still get a few decent spells fairly easily.

Advancement is slow, but characters almost always improve a little bit every session and the training rules support the use of down-time between adventures.

Those are just examples of course, but the point is that many of the problems with any game can tend to get overstated. To use D&D as a problem, caster supremacy is a problem.. but its usually not such a big problem that it breaks the game and it is helped by a GM who understates encounter pacing (for example).

Tldr -

Often, we tend to judge old games on criteria that are not accurate and I wanted to take a moment to evaluate that a little bit. In turn, this will help us more accurately articulate what things could be improved in the game design and what things can be tailored to newer styles (HT again being probably the most clear-eyed example of this, done by people who clearly loved BRP but had very clear ideas about what they wanted to be different).

In conclusion, I’d throw out a couple of personal opinions, hot takes if you will: Three that I would wager are pretty well supported and the fourth which is purely personal.

A: For the time (mid-to-late 80s) the DoD rules, particularly with Expert as an option, compared very favorably to other gaming options on the market at the time in Sweden or in English markets (if they’d been able to read it).

B: DoD compares on decent, and often equal terms to other BRP systems, both at the time and today.

C: DoD was a superior option to D&D at the time.

D: Purely personally I would still take DoD 87 / Expert over D&D5.

Obviously you may fiercely disagree but I hope you found it interesting at least :)
 

Genesis

J'aurais voulu être un artiste
Joined
17 Aug 2000
Messages
10,079
Location
Göteborg
Fram tills för några år sedan var det fortfarande vanligt att se trådar på forumet där folk talade om hur de spelade gamla DoD. Jag vet inte om jag tycker att det är underskattat. Från mitt personliga perspektiv så är det ju så att DoD stödjer en spelstil jag finner ganska ointressant. Jag har hittat spel som gör andra saker än vad DoD gör. Det är inte DoD:s fel, men jag vill fortfarande inte spela det. Huruvida DoD är bättre än D&D5 eller Symbaroum har jag svårt att avgöra. Dels eftersom jag varken spelat D&D5 eller Symbaroum, och dels för att jag har svårt att bedöma kvaliteten i något vars målbild jag inte delar.

Sedan tycker jag att DoD hade problemet med att rälsning var en del av konceptet. Det fanns inga verktyg för att lösa problemet med "spelledaren sköter berättelsen och spelarna sköter sina rollpersoner". Det gör att det ledde till en massa rälsade äventyr som inte var bra. Och det tycker jag att vi kan lasta spelet för. Vi må nu ha hittat en massa verktyg för att ta oss runt det problemet, men jämfört med hur till exempel OSR-entusiaster menar att gammel-D&D fungerade så är ju DoD sämre på detta. Sedan har inte D&D5 eller Symbaroum, vad jag vet, löst detta problem, men det är mer en fråga om att dessa spel har misslyckats än att DoD inte var problematiskt.
 

zo0ok

Rollspelsamatör
Joined
13 Sep 2020
Messages
772
C: DoD was a superior option to D&D at the time.
Not my experience. I grew up in the countryside, isolated from people who had strong opinions on these matters.
When I was 10 I had DoD (87) and D&D (Titan Games).
Later we got Expert for D&D, Expert for DoD, and also AD&D 2e.

We had more fun, longer running campaigns, more success and better memories of D&D than DoD.
I found that D&D allowed the story forward, and DoD (the rules) got in the way.
 

afUttermark

Swordsman
Joined
17 Oct 2011
Messages
603
Min enda kontakt med D&D är genom dataspelet Baldurs Gate. Och det var väl kul men det var ju inte rollspel.
Drakar och Demoner var spelet för mig från 84-94 och det lade väl grunden till allt jag tycker är kul.
 

Genesis

J'aurais voulu être un artiste
Joined
17 Aug 2000
Messages
10,079
Location
Göteborg
@Genesis hur menar du att spelet stöder rälsning? Jag tycker tvärtom att det klarade sig utmärkt utan rälsade äventyr. Och det var i väldigt stor utsträckning så vi spelade det.
Du har en spelledare och förberedda scenarion. Därmed är rälsning en distinkt möjlighet. I spel utan spelledare eller utan förberedda scenarion är inte rälsning möjlig. Med tanke på att det är en risk, om man inte vill att det ska inträffa, så behövs någon form av struktur/regler/råd/tekniker för att styra bort från rälsning. DoD har, såvitt jag minns, inget sådant.
 

erikt

Swordsman
Joined
21 Feb 2014
Messages
663
Du har en spelledare och förberedda scenarion. Därmed är rälsning en distinkt möjlighet. I spel utan spelledare eller utan förberedda scenarion är inte rälsning möjlig. Med tanke på att det är en risk, om man inte vill att det ska inträffa, så behövs någon form av struktur/regler/råd/tekniker för att styra bort från rälsning. DoD har, såvitt jag minns, inget sådant.
DoD är precis lika bra eller dåligt på att undvika rälsning som de flesta andra spel från 70- och 80-talet. I stort sett inget av de spelen hade några särskilda regler för att hantera rälsning.
Rälsning eller inte har betydligt mer med spelstil att göra än med spelregler.
 

Christoffer

It's all pig.
Joined
18 Mar 2008
Messages
2,748
Location
Umeå
Du har en spelledare och förberedda scenarion. Därmed är rälsning en distinkt möjlighet. I spel utan spelledare eller utan förberedda scenarion är inte rälsning möjlig. Med tanke på att det är en risk, om man inte vill att det ska inträffa, så behövs någon form av struktur/regler/råd/tekniker för att styra bort från rälsning. DoD har, såvitt jag minns, inget sådant.
Edit: äh mitt dagen efter migränhuvud kan inte se skillnad på DoD och d&d verkar det som. Tar ett par Treo och vilar hjärnan lite mer.


Min migränhjärna said:
En rätt stor grej med hela gamla d&d-världen (överlag rätt många äldre rollspel skulle jag säga) är ju just att inte förbereda plots, att inte förbereda berättelser, utan situationer och spela för att se vad som kommer hända. Dungeons som hyllas är ju oftast sådana med många öppningar för skeenden, grupperingar som du kan interagera med och kanske spela ut mot varandra, eller vad som nu spelarna får för sig att göra.
 
Last edited:

erikt

Swordsman
Joined
21 Feb 2014
Messages
663
En rätt stor grej med hela gamla d&d-världen (överlag rätt många äldre rollspel skulle jag säga) är ju just att inte förbereda plots, att inte förbereda berättelser, utan situationer och spela för att se vad som kommer hända. Dungeons som hyllas är ju oftast sådana med många öppningar för skeenden, grupperingar som du kan interagera med och kanske spela ut mot varandra, eller vad som nu spelarna får för sig att göra.
Ligger mycket i det.
Har man förberett en berättelse är rälsning nästan oundviklig om berättelsen skall utspela sig som tänkt.
Har man förberett en äventyrsplats behövs det ingen rälsning.
 

Genesis

J'aurais voulu être un artiste
Joined
17 Aug 2000
Messages
10,079
Location
Göteborg
DoD är precis lika bra eller dåligt på att undvika rälsning som de flesta andra spel från 70- och 80-talet. I stort sett inget av de spelen hade några särskilda regler för att hantera rälsning.
Rälsning eller inte har betydligt mer med spelstil att göra än med spelregler.
Javisst. Men det är ju det som är grejen med tråden. Att DoD fortfarande är ett bra spel, trots att det är gammalt. Då kan man inte bedöma det efter tiden det skapades, utan då ska det bedömas med moderna glasögon. Och då tycker jag att det är legitim kritik att det inte gör något för att förhindra eller varna för rälsning. Om man tycker att det är en fråga om spelstil så hör det ju hemma i spelledartipsen. Och såvitt jag minns fanns det inget om detta i spelledartipsen. Snarare känns det som att rälsning var en accepterad och förväntad del av spelstilen. Vilket jag då inte gillar. Därav min kritik.
 

Ram

Behöver klippa mig
Joined
11 May 2004
Messages
4,721
Location
Sturet
Jag hävdar än i dag att Drakar och demoner, den svarta lådan med Elric på, är det bästa rollspel som någonsin skrivits. Det var föredömligt lagom. Det hade regler och färdigheter för att hantera precis lagom mycket och det var tunt nog att aldrig vara i vägen. Till och med det generellt ogillade stridssystemet var fantastiskt då det på ett enkelt sätt gav spelledare möjligheter att skapa mängder med intressanta encounters. Och allt detta på 50-60 sidor där en skaplig andel av dessa är typ intro och kampanj-kapitel.

Vi spelar fortfarande vår evighetskampanj (även om vi ställt in årets sessioner ställts in pga pesten) i svarta lådan-DoD som pågått sedan innan millennieskiftet och njuter fortfarande varje gång.
 

Måns

Duck Champion
Joined
12 Nov 2001
Messages
11,966
Location
Athos
Du har en spelledare och förberedda scenarion. Därmed är rälsning en distinkt möjlighet. I spel utan spelledare eller utan förberedda scenarion är inte rälsning möjlig. Med tanke på att det är en risk, om man inte vill att det ska inträffa, så behövs någon form av struktur/regler/råd/tekniker för att styra bort från rälsning. DoD har, såvitt jag minns, inget sådant.
Ah, ja det är ju sant. Men i trådens anda handlar det inte om vad man eventuellt kan hitta för fel utan vilka styrkor som trots allt fanns.

DoD + Marsklandet bör exempelvis inte resultera i speciellt mycket rälsning. Överlag är min erfarenhet att rälsning blev ett problem långt senare när författarna började skriva intrikata stories som krävde ett visst handlande. Innan dess var det rätt OSR-igt.

Och jag håller helt med @runequester . När det gäller OSR har man lyft fram det bästa, när vi snackar DoD så lyfter vi fram det sämsta.
 

Stämma

Arg vätte
Joined
17 Jul 2020
Messages
43
Location
Södertälje/Uppsala
Jag tycker det är rätt intressant att även om DoD inte har någon direkt OSR-motsvarighet så kan man ändå se rätt mycket spår av DoD-material även på senare tid:
-Konfluxssviten blev romaner och sedan Svavelvinter-rollspelet.
-Spelvärlden i Kopparhavets hjältar drar mycket från Ereb Altor.
-Gullikssons illustrationer dekorerar sidorna i Svärdets sång och får på så sätt internationell spridning.
-Hela DoD-Retro.
-Spindelkonungens pyramid ges ut till Fantasy! Old School Gaming.
Och säkert annat jag inte kommer på just nu.

Att arvet förvaltas så väl tyder väl ändå på att har någon slags aktning och uppskattning.
 

Ram

Behöver klippa mig
Joined
11 May 2004
Messages
4,721
Location
Sturet
Javisst. Men det är ju det som är grejen med tråden. Att DoD fortfarande är ett bra spel, trots att det är gammalt. Då kan man inte bedöma det efter tiden det skapades, utan då ska det bedömas med moderna glasögon. Och då tycker jag att det är legitim kritik att det inte gör något för att förhindra eller varna för rälsning. Om man tycker att det är en fråga om spelstil så hör det ju hemma i spelledartipsen. Och såvitt jag minns fanns det inget om detta i spelledartipsen. Snarare känns det som att rälsning var en accepterad och förväntad del av spelstilen. Vilket jag då inte gillar. Därav min kritik.
Ehm, det där är för mig i paritet med att säga att ett nischat spel är bristfälligt för att det inte har ett stridssystem... Detta system skulle kunna användas för att skapa rälsade scenarios, varningstext bör finnas...? Blandar du inte ihop det faktum att flera av de scenarion som fanns upplevde du som rälsade? För det finns inte mycket i själva spelet som pratar om det. Eventuellt fanns det något exempel i kampanjdelen... Och jag tänker inte ens ge mig in i diskussionen om rälsning är någonting dåligt...
 

krank

Wokevänster-ödleman från Epsilon Eridani
Joined
28 Dec 2002
Messages
31,050
Location
Nynäshamn
För det finns inte mycket i själva spelet som pratar om det.
Fast det är väl exakt det som är kritiken här…?

För min del: de flesta spel jag läst har en otroligt begränsad spelledartekniker-del, framför allt vad gäller hur man strukturerar äventyr och så. Och vad jag vet är DoD inget undantag där. Om då dessutom flera av de tillgängliga köpe-äventyren är eller känns rälsade… (märk väl, jag säger inte "alla" eller ens "flertalet")

I mina ögon är alla rollspel som inte talar om hur man spelleder dem bristfälliga. En del av att tala om hur man spelleder är att tala om hur man förbereder äventyr, om man nu förväntas köra äventyr…
 

runequester

Warrior
Joined
29 Apr 2018
Messages
244
A lot of interesting replies and differing experiences, which is what I was hoping for :)

I assume rälsning is railroading right?

I think it's true that DoD does not really take steps to prevent that because it just wasn't a consideration yet in the industry. You can see from some of the best adventures that the style was meant to be open ended, but communicating HOW to play is just a difficult task. Looking at other games of the era (Runequest 2, Rolemaster, D&D) we get a lot of advice on how to make a game world or whatever, and not much advice on actually being a good GM (though the black book DoD advice on addressing violence is very good and sort of hints at the sort of living world we'd all end up aspiring to).

I think there's also a risk in evaluating games through their published adventures because any prepared scenario must of course include some railroading.

One thing the OSR folks have spent years doing is going back to evaluate the mechanics of original D&D or BX and piece together what kind of game we were all supposed to have been playing all along, to make those games make sense (I have opinions that the new OSR playstyle isnt actually how most people played at the time, but lets go with it). If we examine DoD, especially Expert, we find a lot of attention to training over time, fairly slow advancement, particular and specialized skills, travel times, living expenses and other world simulation stuff in this cosmopolitan fantasy place, which to me at least points to an open-ended experience.
When the game gives a book keeping skill and talks about what I can earn as a scribe, it feels like it definitely has intentions about what I can be doing.
 
Last edited:

Genesis

J'aurais voulu être un artiste
Joined
17 Aug 2000
Messages
10,079
Location
Göteborg
Ah, ja det är ju sant. Men i trådens anda handlar det inte om vad man eventuellt kan hitta för fel utan vilka styrkor som trots allt fanns.

DoD + Marsklandet bör exempelvis inte resultera i speciellt mycket rälsning. Överlag är min erfarenhet att rälsning blev ett problem långt senare när författarna började skriva intrikata stories som krävde ett visst handlande. Innan dess var det rätt OSR-igt.

Och jag håller helt med @runequester . När det gäller OSR har man lyft fram det bästa, när vi snackar DoD så lyfter vi fram det sämsta.
Jag var fyra år gammal 1987, så mina minnen är nog mer av 90-talsutgåvan än av originalet, så jag kan mycket väl ha fel här.

Men det vore intressant med en DoD-OSR-våg som fokuserar på att återskapa det bästa i DoD-87.
 

Ram

Behöver klippa mig
Joined
11 May 2004
Messages
4,721
Location
Sturet
Fast det är väl exakt det som är kritiken här…?

För min del: de flesta spel jag läst har en otroligt begränsad spelledartekniker-del, framför allt vad gäller hur man strukturerar äventyr och så. Och vad jag vet är DoD inget undantag där. Om då dessutom flera av de tillgängliga köpe-äventyren är eller känns rälsade… (märk väl, jag säger inte "alla" eller ens "flertalet")

I mina ögon är alla rollspel som inte talar om hur man spelleder dem bristfälliga. En del av att tala om hur man spelleder är att tala om hur man förbereder äventyr, om man nu förväntas köra äventyr…
Jag å min sida tycker sådana kapitel är onödiga om man inte förväntas göra något som avviker från etablerad norm. Jag finner ingen vits med att utgå från att läsaren är okunnig om hur man skriver ett äventyr eller skapar en historia. Det finns många spel som behöver sådant, men DoD är inte en av dem.

Sedan är detta inte tråden för det, men jag undrar inte sällan hur många som faktiskt spelat äventyren från den tiden och hur många som bygger sin räls-känsla på att man bara läst det. För mig är det som jag tror ni kallar rälsning en negativ spelarupplevelse under spel. Att läsa ett scenario och utifrån perfekt information uppleva något som rälsat tycker inte jag är samma sak.
 

Gurgeh

The Player of Games
Staff member
Joined
23 Feb 2001
Messages
8,400
Location
Linköping
Jag å min sida tycker sådana kapitel är onödiga om man inte förväntas göra något som avviker från etablerad norm. Jag finner ingen vits med att utgå från att läsaren är okunnig om hur man skriver ett äventyr eller skapar en historia. Det finns många spel som behöver sådant, men DoD är inte en av dem.
Eftersom många av de som började spela DoD startade med en låda inköpt i en leksaksaffär, utan tidigare erfarenheter, så behövdes det i allra högsta grad.

Sedan är detta inte tråden för det, men jag undrar inte sällan hur många som faktiskt spelat äventyren från den tiden och hur många som bygger sin räls-känsla på att man bara läst det. För mig är det som jag tror ni kallar rälsning en negativ upplevelse under spel. Att läsa ett scenario och utifrån perfekt information uppleva något som rälsat tycker inte jag är samma sak.
Rälsningen återfanns inte alls i de tidigaste äventyren. (Om man inte tycker att det är räls att det enda som är beskrivet är ett uppdrag, en väg dit och en äventyrsplats.) Rälsningen kom i senare äventyr.
 

krank

Wokevänster-ödleman från Epsilon Eridani
Joined
28 Dec 2002
Messages
31,050
Location
Nynäshamn
Jag å min sida tycker sådana kapitel är onödiga om man inte förväntas göra något som avviker från etablerad norm. Jag finner ingen vits med att utgå från att läsaren är okunnig om hur man skriver ett äventyr eller skapar en historia. Det finns många spel som behöver sådant, men DoD är inte en av dem.
Här blir jag ärligt talat lite förvirrad. Varför skulle man utgå från att läsaren vet hur man skriver ett spelbart äventyr? Nästan inga spel har ju några riktlinjer för det, så på sin höjd har man alltså lite gissningar baserat på härmningar av utgivna äventyr.

Jag menar alltså att det egentligen inte finns någon "etablerad norm", eftersom inga spel egentligen etablerat denna norm och faktiskt talat om hur man gör. Det kan existera lokala etablerade normer i specifika spelgrupper, men på det hela taget? Nej.
 
Top